Animal Emergency Information courtesy of California Wildlife Center.

If you have found a wild animal that is sick, injured, or appears to be in danger in the Southern California area, please follow the instructions below and call (310) 458-WILD.


Deer

Deer  

Injured/Sick Adult Deer

  • Do not attempt to rescue an injured/sick deer yourself
  • From a distance keep an eye on the deer and contact CWC or your local animal control agency immediately

Orphaned Baby Deer

  • Spotted fawns found hiding in the brush should be left alone for 12 hours
  • The mother might leave the fawn in one place for up to 24 hours
  • Do not attempt to approach the fawn at any time
  • If the fawn appears panicked, is crying, appears sick or injured, contact CWC or your local animal control agency immediately

Birds of Prey

Injured/Sick Adult Raptors

  • Get a box and line it with a large towel or newspaper on the bottom. Make air holes.
  • Throw a towel over the raptor’s face and body
  • Turn the box on its side next to the bird
  • Using a broom or large stick, gently push the bird/towel combo into the box.
  • Gently turn the box upright
  • Seal the box. Place it in a quiet, dark location (for example, a bathroom) until you reach hospital staff
  • Do not offer any food or water

Orphaned Baby Raptors

  • It is a federal offense to keep native wildlife as pets.
  • Baby raptors will need immediate care from a licensed rehabilitator
  • It is a federal offence to keep native wildlife as pets
  • Get a box and line it with a large towel on the bottom. Make air holes
  • Toss a light towel over the bird
  • Pick up the baby raptor by the body and place it in the box
  • Seal the box. Place the box in a quiet, dark location (for example, a bathroom) until you reach hospital staff.  Place a heating pad set to medium under the box
  • Do not offer any food or water

Hummingbirds

Injured/Sick Adult Hummingbirds

  • Get a small box and line it with crumpled tissue on the bottom. Make air holes.
  • Pick up the hummingbird by the body and place it in the box.
  • Place it in a quiet, dark location (for example, a bathroom) until you reach hospital staff.
  • Offer the hummingbird a sugar water mixture of one part sugar to four parts water.
  • Use a straw as a pipet. Dip the end of the straw into the sugar water solutions, then offer the straw to the hummingbird.
  • The hummingbird will place its beak into the bottom of the straw and drink.  Let the hummingbird drink as much as it wants every hour until it is transferred to a licensed rehabilitator.
  • Do not get any of the sugar water onto the hummingbird’s feathers, and remove all food/ water before transporting the bird.

 Orphaned Baby Hummingbirds

  • It is a federal offense to keep native wildlife as pets.
  • Get a small box and line it with crumpled tissue on the bottom.  Make air holes.
  • Pick up the baby hummingbirds and place them in the box.
  • Place the box in a quiet, dark location (for example, a bathroom) until you reach hospital staff.  Place a heating pad set to medium under the box.
  • Offer the baby hummingbirds a sugar water mixture of one part sugar to four parts water.
  • Use a straw as a pipet. Dip the end of the straw into the sugar water solution, then offer the straw to the hummingbird.
  • The hummingbird will place its beak into the bottom of the straw and drink.  Let the hummingbird drink as much as it wants every 30 minutes until it is transferred to a licensed rehabilitator.
  • Do not get any of the sugar water onto the hummingbird’s feathers, and remove all food/water before transporting the bird.

Large Predators

  • Large predators (Coyotes, Foxes, Bobcats, and Mountain Lions) should only be transported by trained professionals.
  • If you see a sick or injured predator keep an eye on it from a distance and contact CWC or your local animal control agency immediately.

Marine & Shorebirds

bird-1348253_1920.jpg

Sick/Injured Water Birds

  • Get a box and line it with a large towel on the bottom. Make air holes.
  • Throw a towel over the bird’s face and body.
  • Pick up the water bird by the body and place it in the box.
  • Always hold the bird so the head is facing away from you.
  • Seal the box. Place it in a quiet, dark location (for example, a bathroom) until you reach hospital staff.
  • Do not offer any food or water.
  • Never return a water bird back to the water or place it in a tub of water.
  • Do not remove any fishing hooks or pull/tug/move/cut any fishing line.
  • If the bird is particularly strong or large, contact your local animal control agency to contain this bird.

Marine Mammals

  • Do not touch, pick up, harass, feed, or pour water on the animal. Marine mammals can easily cause harm, and are easily stressed by humans.
  • Do not return the animal to the water. Seals and sea lions temporarily “haul-out” on land to rest.  Harbor seal mothers often leave their pups ashore while they’re feeding at sea.  A beached whale, dolphin, or porpoise should be reported immediately.
  • Observe the animal from a distance of at least 50 feet. Keep people and dogs away.
  • Take note of any physical characteristics such as size, presence of external earflaps, and fur color.  This information will help the response team determine the species and what rescue equipment is needed.
  • Take note of the animal’s condition. Is it weak and underweight? Are there any open wounds?
  • Does the animal have any obvious identification tags or markings?
  • Determine the exact location of the animal and provide accurate directions. It’s not possible to rescue an animal if it cannot be located.
  • Call the Marine Mammal Response Team and provide them with as much information as possible at 310-458-WILD (9453)

Opossums

Sick/Injured Adult Opossums

  • Get a box and line it with a large towel on the bottom. Make air holes.
  • Throw a towel over the opossum’s face and body.
  • Wearing leather gloves, pick up the opossum by the body and place it into the box.
  • Seal the box. Place it in aquiet, dark location (for example, a bathroom) until you reach CWC staff.
  • Do not offer any food or water.

 Orphaned Baby Opossums

  • It is a federal offense to keep opossums as pets in California.
  • Juvenile opossums are independent of the parent at about 6″ in length from the nose to the base of the tail.
  • Orphaned baby opossums will need immediate care from a licensed rehabilitator.
  • Get a box and line it with a towel on the bottom. Make air holes.
  • Pick up the baby opossums by the body and place them in the box.
  • Seal the box. Place the box in a quiet, dark location (for example, a bathroom) until you reach hospital staff. Place a heating pad set to low under half of the box.
  • Do not offer any food or water.

Rabbits

Sick/Injured Adult Rabbits

  • Get a box and line it with a large towel or newspaper on the bottom.
  • Throw a towel over the rabbit’s face and body.
  • Pick up the rabbit by the body and place it in the box.
  • Seal the box. Place it in a quiet, dark location (for example, a bathroom) until you reach CWC staff. Place to a heating pad set to low under half of the box.
  • Do not offer any food or water.
  • Rabbits die very easily from stress.  Limit all talking, loud noises, and handling.

 Orphaned Baby Rabbits

  • It is a federal offense to keep native wildlife as pets.
  • Juvenile rabbits are independent of their parent when they are about 4″ long, have full fur and erect ears.
  • Orphaned baby bunnies will need immediate care from a licensed rehabilitator.
  • Get a box and line it with a towel on the bottom.  Make air holes.
  • Pick up the baby bunnies by the body and place them in the box.
  • Seal the box.  Place the box in a quiet, dark location (for example, a bathroom) until you reach CWC staff.  Place a heating pad set to low under half of the box.
  • Do not offer any food or water.

Raccoons

  • Raccoons should only be transported by trained professionals.
  • If you see a sick, injured, or orphaned raccoon, contact your local animal control agency immediately.
  • Anyone who has been bitten by a raccoon should notify their physician and public health department within 24 hours, and the raccoon should be held for testing.

Skunks

Sick/Injured Adult Skunks

  • Adult skunks should only be transported by trained professionals.
  • If you see a sick or injured adult skunk, contact local animal control agency immediately.
  • Anyone who has been bitten by a skunk should notify their physician and public health department within 24 hours, and the skunk should be held for testing.

 Orphaned Baby Skunks

  • It is a federal offense to keep native wildlife as pets.
  • Orphaned baby skunks will need immediate care from a licensed rehabilitator.
  • Get a box and line it with a towel on the bottom.  Make air holes.
  • Throw a towel over the skunk’s face and body.
  • Turn the box on its side next to the skunk.
  • Using a broom or large stick, gently push the skunk/towel combo into the box.
  • Gently turn the box upright.
  • Seal the box. Place the box in a quiet, dark location until you reach CWC staff. place a heating pad set to low, under half the box.
  • Do not offer any food or water.

Squirrels

Sick/Injured Adult Squirrels

  • Get a box and line it with a towel or newspaper on the bottom.  Make air holes.
  • Throw a towel over the squirrel’s face and body.
  • Turn the box on its side next to the squirrel.
  • Using a broom or large stick, gently push the squirrel/towel combo into the box.
  • Gently turn the box upright.
  • Seal the box.  Place it in a quiet, dark location (for example, a bathroom) until you reach hospital.
  • Do not offer any food or water.

Orphaned Baby Squirrels

  • It is a federal offense to keep native wildlife as pets.
  • Orphaned baby squirrels will need immediate care from a licensed rehabilitator.
  • Get a box and line it with a towel on the bottom. Make air holes.
  • Pick up the baby squirrel by the body and place it in the box.
  • Seal the box. Place the box in a quiet, dark location (for example, a bathroom) until you reach CWC. Place a heating pad set to low under half the box.
  • Do not offer any food or water.